What is shutter speed in camera?

The definition of the shutter speed
Here all is simple. The shutter speed refers to the amount of time that the shutter is open. It measures in fractions of seconds. The bigger the denominator the faster shutter speed, the less light getting trough.
The measurement
Very fast shutter speed will be displayed as 1/2000 or more, when it reaches 1-second or slower it displayed as the number with double quote 30″ (equal to 30 seconds)

Freeze the motion
The faster shutter speed allows to freeze the motion, such as splashes. Slow shutter speed may provide interesting motion blur effects.

What is shutter speed in camera?

 

How to use it
  • When you deal with the very bright daylight situation you may use fast shutter speed such as 1/1000 or more.
  • The bird in the sky in a sunny day and you want it looks very sharp — your shutter speed will be above 1/2000
  • You kids are playing and you want to have clear sharp pictures — your shutter speed will be above 1/500
  • When you work with the studio light the shutter speed synchronized with the speed of the flash and it not suppose to be more than 1/250 or 1/125 (check the instruction of your camera)
  • A portrait will require anything from 1/125
  • If you shoot handheld you shutter speed suppose to be not less than 1/60, otherwise images may not be sharp.
  • If you have to use slower shutter speed you need to use support such as a tripod or useful replacement of it.
  • You want to make mysterious waterfall with blurry water and sharp landscape your shutter speed will be below 1/30
  • If you want to photograph the city in the night you will use very slow shutter speed something like 30″ and small aperture from F/13 to F/22. In this situation, very strong tripod is the must (even micro move of the camera will destroy the photo)
P.S. If you like to click stories about street food, markets, malls and other activity you may need to use faster shutter speed in a low light condition. In this situation, you will need to adjust shutter speed aperture and ISO read here how.

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  1. […] exposure triangleExposure consists of the three components: Aperture, Shutter Speed, and ISO. Each represents the equal side of the exposure triangle. To use this idea, just imagine […]

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