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Build your tribe with the right branding

People love brands. They follow the ideas; they share the sense of being a part of a brand community. If you ever loved the brand, you would know who are other customers. Long ago Apple aimed at creative young people; they knew they had a need for the different aesthetics and approach, so they created their products based on their client’s perception about a good UI or good device. If you ever talk to advertising creative teams, you would find that many of them are proud Apple product users. Yes, no mistake, they are proud. They got that community idea from the old times and still follow it.

Check the internet and see how many people talk about the shifted from iPhone to Android. For this type of category, it is a powerful controversy headline. Which means “how dare you switch”. But Apple is no longer so exclusive. It becomes an average expensive product, innovations are in their past as of now they are playing safe, and the charm and magic of the Job’s Apple almost vanish.

Another example is Hugo Boss, Hermes, Burberry, Jimmy Choo. All these brands convey the prestige. People choose them to get into the different world, to be a part of the success community. Sometimes they may have nothing to eat, but they will buy a branded bag or car. Well, that’s extreme and illustrates a dark side of a brand, (big brands in particular).

When you build your brand, you create a centre, an attraction factor where your tribe will gather. They will believe your message, your actions, your promises and they will recommend you to other people. With no reason, just because they love your brand.

Four things to know to attract the Ideal client to your brand

When we start our business, we need to know several things that we are going to do, who we are going to sell it and why they need it. This knowledge helps us to build an established business. Surprisingly, the same data helps us to create a successful brand.

I’ve created several topics about target audience already. And think, you already know what are you going to do. So here we will touch the most important client’s pain points, fears, dreams and desires.

If we want to communicate to customers in the right way, not just share the theory, we need to speak in their language about their issues. But even if you know who your ideal client is, how do you find their pain points, fears, dreams and desires? Asking about such things a little bit weird, isn’t it? First of all, if you know your ideal client, or at least target audience, you would be aware where their hangout. Let’s check these places:

Facebook groups.

Become a member of the group where your potential customers might be. Once you are in, add your keywords or potential pain points in the search field on the top right. That way you will have the list of comments and discussions related to your topic. Collect this information in one file, either by copy pasting it or screenshots. You will work with it later

Books they buy from Amazon.

The books relevant to your theme also have some comments below. Check what people say about solutions. What excited them and what disappointed them. You can use both to improve your business and add some features to your product.

Blogs they read.

Bloggers often touch the themes which are relevant to your product.Check the comments. These comments themselves are a fruitful field for blogging. People often ask for the solution. Keep in mind the way how they ask for it. What types of keywords they choose. What tone of the voice they use and what answers satisfied them.

Quora.com

Quora has thousands of questions relevant to your client’s pains and fears. Check the conversations. The questions as well the answers may work just like magic. You can create hundreds of topics in hours.

Twitter

Check for groups and lists first. You may find good collections of influencers or leaders who talk about your solutions or problems. Twitter search may also help in this situations.

Other Groups

LinkedIn and Google also have groups, and some of them are super active. You can look for your data there as well.

Famous Youtube channels

The leaders and influencers often have their Youtube channel. Check them out, they have probably spoke about this already. There can be some decent comments in there. Same works with podcasts.

If you have a huge list of followers

Do the survey. People who follow you already have a reason to be with you. Even if they didn’t buy from you, they quite probably like to read what you write or watch your video. Ask them.

And the cherry on the pie.

If you already have clients, (and I always recommend to build the brand only after you have clients) ask them. The real customers already have a reason; they know why they buy your product. More than that, they can recommend you how to improve it.

Rock your travel guide or any other product with this formula

Last week, I had some conversation with a very talented girl. She calls herself a writer, writes Travel Guides, and owns a travel agency. But she is losing the traffic to her blog. And, I must say, I heard it many times. Blog traffic is going down; people don’t want to read my texts, less likes, shares — what should I do?

When I analyse their blogs, I see the repetitive picture. It reminds me of corporate sites and small blogs. People were talking about the value for such a long time, that they have forgotten about the execution. Their headlines are SEO friendly but generic and meaningless and texts vary from average to good. They try to write for everyone in order not lose customers but get no readers instead.

So what can you do to increase your blog traffic and engagement on social media? Well, there are several ways, and I will focus on two in this post: target audience and authenticity (I know it’s a cliche). I also have to say that there’s no new tactic you need; you only require to change the basic idea and ask yourself “Who is my reader?”.

That sounds obvious, but many bloggers think “Why would I repel my customers?” And, here is the catch. You can’t be a specialist in everything. People know it and trust those who specialise in something. Your specialisation often can be based on the industry segment, and not on human characteristics. So, just analyse if you clearly want to attract a particular target group, you shouldn’t write for all – “all” will not read you. There are many big players with deep pockets who write “for all”. If your content is generic and your products have some common names, you have little chance to win. But you can overcome the obstacles if you take a segment of the big site audience and dedicate several of your posts to it. Same target principle is relevant to your headlines, menu names, and your site sections.

Here are a couple of examples from the real conversation.

For instance, you write for single parents who love to travel with their kids. That’s a direction and if you want to give them a “Travel Guide”, you do not need to call it a “Travel Guide”. Call it: “A Travel Guide, which helps your kids to have an unforgettable weekend in city x”, That way you will target travelling parents, both single and coupled. Or you can narrow the segment and say, “Travel Guide. Have fun with your kids while exploring the city X, even if you are a single parent” (It requires a very specific content, but it makes sense to write it). But if you have such a guide, you already know what to write and where to advertise it and who to target in your ads. It makes your business directed and marketing much more straightforward.
Other target groups also love moving around the world so –“Travel Guide for single executives” or “Travel guide for students’ budget” will attract very particular groups. So as you see, you can take a general thing like “Travel Guide” and transform it into a dedicated product.

If you follow the idea, you would probably understand that you are not narrowing your income, but making yourself an expert, and an authority worth listening to. If your “Travel guide” was useful and unusual, your audiences would share it, and their friends are not necessarily single parents or even have kids, but with recommendations, it may work for them as well.

I also want to add a little bit of my experience on this topic. It’s difficult to find accommodation for a single traveller, and most of the times, you have to pay the same amount of money as two travellers. People who travel with kids need different entertainment than single 30-40 years old executives. Based on this, if you write for all, you miss all.

In conclusion, if you love to create travel guides, here are some ideas which would make me love them or buy. Good professional pictures, fantastic and inviting design, appealing copy; so that I enjoy reading them even on my phone. And, here are a couple of names for your guides: “Secret places of city X”, “Make your Instagram rock with these secret locations of city X”, “The best place where locals enjoy to eat in city X”, and “Magic of local art and craft in city x”.

As you see, I shortlisted the themes which are engaging to me and added the particular location. Such portion guides can be combined in a big project eventually (for city X) and sell well too. So my formula for a good “Travel Guide” is pretty simple – “Excellent content based on Interest, Location, Audience”.
You can make any successful product based on it and win your customer’s heart.

All you need to know about your Target Audience.

Target Audience is a core theme of any promotion, advertising campaign and of course, business strategy. It’s a particular group of people within the specific target market which is going to buy your product and listen to your advertising messages.

To sell successfully, we need to find these people. And surely we will start with an idea and imagination. Imagine your ideal customer who is this person and why is he or she going to purchase your products or services?

Not all consumers are the same. Some people will prefer to buy your goods and others will not. Some will love to buy from you but will not be able to afford it. So your main criteria, as always, is the capability and zeal to spend some money for your stuff.

Business needs to recognise what problem their product or service solves, or what demands it meets, to set the “target audience” .

And now let’s create our ideal customer.

The First level of understanding is Demographics.

  • What is the age of your TA?
  • What is TA gender (he, she, other)?
  • What ethnic/cultural/religious group your TA belongs to?
  • What is their income level?
  • Are they single or married or divorced?
  • Do they have children or do they support elders in the family?
  • What are they doing for a living?
  • What type of education they got?

Geographic Sub Level

  • Where are your customers located?

The answers will allow you to understand who is your target audience on a very basic level.

The Second level is Psychographics
This level is a bit deeper and requires some field work. Some marketers recommend following your customer to understand what they do during the day. (I think you can start with a few questions before you become a detective) –

  • What values your TA shares?
  • What interest and hobbies it has?
  • What type of lifestyle it has? (this is important to understand that we are dealing with real lifestyle and not the social media one. A lifestyle is defined in three main sections – activities, interests, and opinions).
  • What books or magazines they read?
  • Which sites they visit?
  • Whom do they vote for during election?

The third level is Behavioral. Dig deeper.

  • What makes them buy?
  • Who influences them?
  • What type of purchase do they love – online or offline?
  • Also, where do they read and how do they consume information?
  • How do they spend the day? (For example, people who drive the car to work will not be able to read a newspaper during this time, but will be able to get some audio information. On the other hand, the person who reaches the work by metro has plenty of time for reading, but may prefer listening to something on headphones instead).

A deep analysis of this level will help you get how to reach your customers.

Moving Forward

The moment you create a portrait of your ideal customer and research on it in real life, start asking them questions. Analyse the market. Do they like to buy your products if no why, if yes when? You may find out that your imaginary target audience has nothing to do with your product and you could make more money with a better targeting.

Once upon a time, we were working with the bra company which primarily sold one type of bra to teenagers for over twenty years. The product was very old-fashioned and we doubted that teenagers would buy anything like this. So we did a research and found out that product is doing pretty well. Except we were right, for the last 20 years, very few teenagers got it as a gift. The main buyers were ladies over the age of sixty. They did love cotton fabric, great range of sizes and super affordable prize. Could the client make better if he advertised to this group?

Want more? Read how to find your target audience.

Find your real target audience

“Define your target audience.” How many times have you heard these words since you decided to become an entrepreneur? Well, yes it’s a common knowledge and sounds like an old and useless information. Partially it’s true as it’s “Captain Obvious” type of data. However let me prove you that it’s not that all known and useless after all.

Advertising agencies made the “target audience” word almost a mantra. These people are your everything. You make research on them; you sell only to them, and you talk only to them. And while it sounds very evident, defining the target audience or target group on your own, it’s not that easy as it seems.

Check this questions set to define your TA

We all have a good imagination and we all can create some imaginary people in our minds and then try to sell them our product. And that’s where all of us start. But with time, many never move from this stage. They still try to sell to an imaginary target group or to “all people on the Globe”.

How many times I’ve asked my friends: “What do you think about this idea or product?” And they answered this way: “Well I guess it’s a good idea at least for those who are interested in this subject”. What does that mean? That means that they are not interested in your product at all, but they try to be polite and helpful. The truth is that we gain zero information from these type of answers. So be careful when you ask good friends.

You need to find people 90% of whom will buy your product if it exists and they know about it. What if you don’t know anybody from the group? The best way to find them is to start asking friends this way: “I have in mind “this product” and need to run some test sessions with someone who can be interested, maybe you have someone in mind?” This way your friend will be able to help in a better way.

You can ask similar questions in the related groups on Social Media. You can ask this question on the sites like Reddit.com or Quora.com. Find your prospects at Industry Events. Or create an even yourself if you do it for a local market. It’s always better to start with some test sessions. It will give you real time feedback and perhaps turn testers into customers eventually.

Please share your questions and ideas in a “comments section” below. Cheers 🙂