Three myths about Facebook or how to save thousands on advertisement

Let’s talk about Facebook. It’s definitely the largest Social Media Platform, and probably the most popular. Many will say: “it’s free and so entertaining” or “but it’s good only for young people”, or “it only for fun”, or “only to chat with friends and kitten pics”… Well, is that so? Let’s check it out.

The Myth 1. Facebook is free.

How many times you heard that Facebook is free platform and we must accept anything they do, even if we don’t like it, because it’s FREE. Well, let me tell you. Ever since you started the account, Facebook has been collecting information about you. They probably never sell this information. But the accurate targeting of facebook ads is only possible because of the user’s data. So advertisers pay this media, to be on your timeline. That means, at least, to me, I get all the Facebook fun and pay via my personal information in exchange. So, is Facebook free? Think of it.

The Myth 2. Advertise your page, boost your posts and it will help you sell.

Let me tell you, I was reading about wonders with Facebook advertising. But since they change the rules and every page owner have to advertise the content (even if it’s not a commercial page), it lost all sense. I had a page, it got 300 followers naturally. All of them were active and the page was alive. The 25% content was of my blog and 75% was entertainment (I posted content from other pages and sites while some content was my own). Now my loyal users do not see posts from my page (because of the new rules). Please answer a simple question, if I decide to boost my posts, would I advertise somebody else’s content? No! It means my followers will only see that 15-25% of commercial or my blog content. Will they like my page, or will they buy my product? No! Because they are simply not aware of 75% of the other content that I shared. As a result, I recommend my customers to not using facebook advertising for Page Likes (Likes may be fake, and users may not be active).

The Myth 3. It’s only for young people.

Since its inception, Facebook has changed a lot. If 5 years ago, it was fun-oriented media, nowadays it’s a good source of news and communication. Thanks to Messenger. It also become a connection tool and partially replaced the SMS. Mothers are following children and know more without questions (such a relief). Employers check new workers (be aware of what you post). Also, you can subscribe almost anywhere using just Facebook. It’s clearly not only for youngsters anymore, it has become practical.

So if you want to save thousands on the Facebook advertisement, you have several choices.

  • First accept that with many “fake likes”, you may not reach the real customers, and don’t spend on Facebook advertisement. Use some other platform for it
  • Secondly, post 4-6 times per day – be useful all the time and try hard, you will gain the attention of both – the real and fake accounts, although, very slowly
  • Third — just use Facebook as a posting schedule tool for your Twitter account and advertise there your Facebook page
  • Fourthly, talk about your page in groups, but do it after you confirm it with the group owner, they may charge you for ads, but in many medium groups, users are real, so you will avoid fake likes.

Meanwhile, if you like to improve the visual communication of your Social Media profiles, you can subscribe and get FREE BOOK “Good Photo=Good brand”! Cheers.

How design and photography work for your brand

I’ve been working in the advertising industry for many years. Once upon a time, I was a designer and it was a tough job. But life changed, and if you need to create a design for your online communication today, you can make pretty good artwork on your own. Here are some ideas how.

Part 1. Less is bliss.

The better design — the lesser the unnecessary elements it has. Remove all redundant components and keep only indispensable ones to achieve perfection.

  • Less means — readable fonts, it is better to use professional fonts (check some here)
  • Less means — enough of breathing space around the elements of your design, also, it makes the design look more expensive. (Check Apple Ads)
  • If you are not trained to design professionally, NEVER use this: gold decorations, free unreadable fancy fonts, and acid-bright gradients (unless you sell golden toilets to Russian oligarchs)

Part 2. To Know or not know the software.

Some people think that the software knowledge miraculously transforms them into designers. Wrong! If you just know Corel Draw or Photoshop you are not a designer yet, you are a person who knows Corel Draw or Photoshop.

The software is a tool. You have to know it without a doubt. But artistic taste, composition, understanding of colour, broad knowledge of typography, drawing skills, and many other artistries are more important then new devices and programmes.

Hint: Think with a pencil in the hand!

Part 3. Photography and design.

If you add a logo to the photo, it’s already a design attempt and it brings more information to the customer than a just photo or a logo itself.

  • If your message is more important than the photo, check out the balance between both. Buyer’s attention has to be on the headline, message or call to action.
  • If you plan the photo shoot, check out if you leave enough of space for the text in you photographs. Plan it in advance. (Check how to plan photoshoot)
  • Click some backgrounds on location to add text over them later. Let them not be too cluttered. You can click interiors, landscape, textures and many other things to use them as backgrounds in the future projects. Try to keep in mind what type of business you advertise; it may give an idea which textures you may need, or what backgrounds will correspond with your concept more.
  • Always remember the difference between commercial and editorial photography. While one product on a white base with little text may sell the phone, it won’t show the story behind. If you need a story, the creatives have to tell it.

Social media platforms and print media may be suitable for different type of design and photography. Do your research to find out which pictures will engage your audience better and on which platform to place them.

Part 4. Design as it is.

Many times you may like to use the design without any photography. And when you start to create your brand, it’s great to know how it will work via pure design; how it will work via pure photography; or how it will manifest itself via a combination of design + photography.

  • The pure design aesthetic requires a clearer font solutions, careful colour choices and supporting elements such as icons.
  • Even if we add an elaborate illustration or infographic to it, the brand message and style still have to be delivered to a consumer.

Part 5. Easy templates.

With easy technology in hands nowadays, more people can create good looking compositions. Use canva.com or fotor.com both of these online designing and editing sites will help the beginners via sets of fantastic templates and predesigned elements. Both sites have some advantages and disadvantages, so try them and choose one which you appreciate more.

  • If you want to create decent creatives, follow the template to a T. If you see four letters in the template word — use a four-letter word. If they use some font, do not change it. If they use those colours, it’s probably on purpose.
  • Eventually, you will be able to create similar designs on your own. But it will require some time, learning and practice.
  • Both sites are amazing platforms to hone your creative skills and give a real push to your Social media.

In conclusion

Design and photography are the versatile elements of visual communication. They can work independently or in combination. The illustrations, icons, fonts and other components have to be used in moderation to crave the ideal brand message for people who are going to buy your product.

P.S. Read more about design and photography in my new book “Good photo = good brand”. Cheers 🙂

Anatomy of the food photography photo shoot

Let me ask photographers – How often you receive the call from a potential client and his expectations about photoshoot appear far from real? Something like — “I need 200 dishes to be shot for my site”, “Your charge is $700 for one day? No, it’s huge, I don’t have such a budget.” And then you need to explain that unlike in a product photography, in the food photography, you will probably cover six to ten dishes in one day, yes only this much.

So dear food entrepreneurs, I decide to give a bit of clarity for you on how the photo shoot happens. I will not tell you how commercial photo shoot for international brands works, as different budgets and a different number of people are involved. But instead, I’ll just share how we work in our studio.

Step 1. Brief

Let’s start from the client’s call. Once we receive the call and discuss details, we usually ask a few questions like

  • Which cuisine are we going to deal with?
  • How many dishes we need to capture?
  • Who is going to style the food?
  • Who is cooking?
  • Are we shooting in the studio or on the location?
  • What is the core brand message you want to convey the customers?
  • We also ask to send us the list of the dishes. and the reference pictures to guide us better. We confirm if the client wants something specific along with those dishes (like some special props or garnishing).

Step 2. Estimate. Advance. Planning

When we get our answers, references, and other details, we provide clients with an estimated cost of the shoot based on days, a number of people and efforts involved.

Many people believe that shooting is about two days of work and then it sounds too expensive. Well, it’s not even close to it. The one day of the photo shoot is usually followed by a week or more of postproduction. And also, count the few days of preparation in advance.

So when the estimate is approved, we start collecting the props and drawing the drafts which we finalize with the client later. By this time, the client provides us a 50% advance. Once ideas are finalized, we all meet in a studio or on the location.

Step3. The Photoshoot

The shoot usually starts early in the morning. If we shoot with the natural light then we have about five hours of shooting hours. It means we have to be fast, and the client has to be very organized and provide the dishes on time. If we shoot with artificial light, we need a lot of space (that means if we shoot in the restaurant, you may not serve that day, if the place is small).

The little trick clients like to use is to ask for one dish in two different setups. Well if you have one dish in two setups, it will be calculated as two dishes (because each setup takes independent time on the dish).

The more elements decided before the day of a photo shoot, the better. The less time will be wasted. Any changes in the plan during a shoot will eat time and add to the cost.

The shooting time starts when the photographer starts from his location. It means that the time of traveling and transportation must be estimated in those shooting hours. After arrival, the crew starts unpacking and setting up lights according to the plan. It normally takes about an hour. After the photo shoot, the crew collects the lights and packs them. That means if the location is not ready before the arrival of photographer and his team, you already pay for his time. (Remember this rule, it can save you a lot of money. Shooting in the photographers’ studio also saves your time).

Step4. The post processing and final payment.

So, the shooting is over. Client goes home and waits for about seven-ten days. I often meet the clients who call you next day and request images on ASAP basis. Well, I never give unprocessed images, because I’m a professional (So if you want images directly from the camera on the very same day, well, you can save a lot by shooting yourself. If you want professional results — please wait!).

What do we do all this time? We open RAW files in a software like Lightroom and start choosing the best images (best composition, sharpness, light, freshness). It may take one to two days. All images are studied in a proportion of 1:1. Then we process the images, make all the technical adjustments in several editing programs. It takes another four-six days. In about eight days, we will send you the watermarked images for approval. The moment the images are approved and we get remaining 50% of the payment, we share high-resolution images with the client. (Via FTP or CD).

In conclusion.

As you see, it’s not just about clicking a few pics, it’s quite a process. That’s why I think clients need to learn basic photography, at least, to make good pictures for the social media. Or to know how to brief the photographer and achieve the best results during a professional photo shoot.

P.S. If you like to learn more about photography which also works for the brand, please subscribe and receive newest studies from Eve’s photo School.

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